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Published: 2021-12-20

Major changes and pedagogical challenges in the curriculum of physicians in the post-pandemic of COVID-19: a systematic review

FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FACERES – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
FAMERP – College of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Medical education Medical curriculum Telehealth Management Disciplines COVID-19

Abstract

Introduction: Respiratory disease (COVID-19) caused by the new coronavirus (SARSCoV-2) has spread around the world causing respiratory illnesses and deaths. The COVID-19 pandemic caused an unprecedented crisis in the field of education. It is essential to reflect on the role of educational systems in curricular training, especially for doctors. Objective: The present study prepared a systematic review to analyze the main curriculum changes in medical education institutions around the world. Methods: The present study followed a systematic review model (PRISMA). The search strategy was performed in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Scopus, and Google Scholar database, using scientific articles from 2009 to 2021. Results: As a corollary of the literary search system, 155 studies were analyzed and submitted to eligibility analysis, and then 55 high to moderate quality studies were selected. Biases did not compromise the scientific basis of the studies. It was analyzed that it is crucial that the academic education community learn from experience and prioritize a forward-thinking academic approach as practical solutions are implemented. The pandemic has brought about a lasting transformation in medicine with the advancement of telehealth, adaptive research protocols, and clinical trials with flexible approaches to achieving solutions. The studies analyzed in general did not address criticisms about the weaknesses of remote education, limiting themselves to defending it as the only viable strategy. There was no consensus on the inclusion of students in the practical activities of curricular internships and medical internships. A part of the studies defends the inclusion in hospital spaces as a way to contribute to overcoming the health crisis imposed by the pandemic. The studies evidenced the inclusion of pandemic management disciplines with a focus on public health in the medical curricula. Conclusion: The medical activity and curriculum underwent and are undergoing significant changes and adaptations. Thus, the doctor will need to develop other skills, without losing the traditional ones. The highlight is telehealth and soft skills, as they will allow students to connect to the best in world medicine, highlighting the importance of scientific knowledge when establishing treatments in cases of pandemics with a focus on public health.

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How to Cite

Anbar Neto, T., Zotarelli Filho, I. J., Anbar, J. P. D., Meinberg, M. L. R., Faria, T. V., Iembo, T., Cardoso, M., Calixto, C. T. A., Shimabukuro, C. Y. A., & Facio Júnior, F. N. (2021). Major changes and pedagogical challenges in the curriculum of physicians in the post-pandemic of COVID-19: a systematic review. MedNEXT Journal of Medical and Health Sciences, 2(5). https://doi.org/10.54448/mdnt21519