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Published: 2021-12-18

Analysis of the racial profile of women with COVID-19: a cross-sectional study about evolution to death of black women in the southeast region of Brazil

UNIRIO - Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
UNIRIO - Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
UNIRIO - Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
UNIRIO - Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
UNIRIO - Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
UNIRIO - Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
UNIRIO - Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
COVID-19 Women Brazil Deaths Health Status Disparities

Abstract

Introduction: The first coronavirus disease (COVID-19) case in Brazil was registered in December 2019. Since then, an important social situation has been highlighted. Black women correspond to the highest death rate, by group, in the Southeast even not occupying the highest percentage of diagnosis. This scenario was also experienced in other places around the world. Therefore, some questions must be highlighted, such as social and economic vulnerability of black population in brazilian territory, less access to health service and testing for Covid-19. Objective: This study analyzed the clinical picture and evolution - cure or death-of black women with COVID-19 in the Southeast region. In addition, consolidating knowledge about the factors that precede death in black women and comparing them with other race groups. Methods:  Cross-sectional study with data from the Ministry of Health's Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) from March to November 23, 2020, with a total number of women classified as level 5, with SARS caused by the virus SARS-Cov-2, equal to 33,991, being 21,551 white and 12,063 black. Results and Conclusion: Therefore, black women present themselves as a vulnerable group in relation to COVID-19. This group was less present in the ICU, but both groups, white and black women, had dyspnea as an aggravating factor. Considering those facts, it's possible that black women had less access, this would explain a greater number of deaths among this group compared to white women, which could signify a failure in the health care of this population. When analyzing deaths by age group, it is evident that white women followed the literature pattern - severe forms occur in patients over 65 years of age with comorbidities, while there was a rejuvenation of deaths among black women. It is a limitation of our study not to include comorbidities in the analysis. This situation becomes relevant for directing public policies that aim to reverse the factors associated with this situation. More studies are needed to elucidate the socioeconomic issues that support this outcome, seeking to reduce the number of deaths from COVID-19 in black women.

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How to Cite

Fonseca, M. S. R. da ., Almeida, F. D. G., Guimarães, G. M. M. O., Lima, F. H. P. C. de, Amaral, S. J. M., Tokumoto, T., & Belmonte, T. de S. A. (2021). Analysis of the racial profile of women with COVID-19: a cross-sectional study about evolution to death of black women in the southeast region of Brazil. MedNEXT Journal of Medical and Health Sciences, 2(6). https://doi.org/10.54448/mdnt21636